Foliage Plants For Indoors

Plants grown for the shape or color of their leaves, where these traits are the most prominent feature, are called foliage plants. They are often used as part of living room decor and can therefore be quite impressive additions, provided they are taken care of. Foliage plants work well as houseplants as they are more tolerant of indoor conditions than most plants.

As a focal point, large-leaved varieties such as Kashmiri Kesar monstera deliciosa, rubber plants (Ficus elastica), saddle-leaved philodendron (P. bipinnatifidum), umbrella tree (Schefflera), become pieces of ” living decoration” and can provide years of pleasure.

The size of the plants you choose for your home decor, of course, depends on the available space you have. However, there are numerous small or dwarf varieties of most species.

How to buy indoor plants

Indoor plants that are grown in glass greenhouses where the atmosphere is controlled and feeding and watering are regular, when brought into an average home, they are suddenly faced with a completely new environment and can go into a state of shock and sit there, sulking. for weeks. Certainly less light, inadequate ventilation with doors generally closed, warmer temperatures, drafts, and dry air all add up to conditions for these plants that could be considered adverse. Then of course there is YOU. For some people, the feeding, watering, and general care of their houseplants is decidedly “happiness.”

If you have bought your plants in a supermarket, they are probably already suffering a lot. From the rather rough treatment by hordes of customers, to traffic, to the disjointed care of pimpled teenagers, to the debilitating effects of fluorescent lighting. I would always recommend visiting a reputable houseplant nursery for quality plants.

Here are some tips to keep in mind when buying your houseplants.

1.Health.

Run your hands through the leaves, depending on the variety; in any case, “feel” the plant. A plant that wobbles in its pot may not be rooted well. This may be an indication of root rot or similar disease problems. Do the leaves and stems have resistance, do they return to their position? Or do they look flabby or “tired”? This may be an indication of a larger problem with the plant or poor care; either way, do not pick these plants. Being tactile with plants also gives you the opportunity to observe anything that might fall or fly away, such as caterpillars or whiteflies; this again is due to poor care. Change nursery.

2. Attractive capacity.

As will be seen every day of the year, the plants must be perennials or perennials. Nothing less attractive in the interior than a pot full of twigs, waiting for spring.

3. Maintenance Charge.

It is preferable to have varieties that are relatively slow growing, as this reduces the amount of time needed for pruning and training. Also, insects are attracted to the sap-filled new growth found on fast-growing ones. Generally speaking, what you really want is to play with the plants in your house as little as possible.

4. Crowded roots.

Check the bottom of the plant for roots coming out of the drainage holes. Roots emerging from holes in the pot do not necessarily mean the plant needs to be repotted, but it is often an indication. Root bound plants will require repotting when you bring the plant home, similarly if the soil is loose in the pot this is an indication that it has been recently repotted and is selling too soon, You can tell this if the soil spills out of the pot when you tilt it at an angle. You are looking for plants that are established in their pots and therefore stable soil.